Plants at Hastings

The Plants of Hastings

A product of the work of Dr. Jim Griffen

For over 25 years, Dr. Jim Griffin worked at Hastings on various aspects of plants and plant ecology. Jim wrote a flora, (or a book describing each plant) for Hastings. For each plant, Jim wrote up a brief description and included some interesting natural history. The Flora of Hastings is based on over 3,000 specimens of plants preserved by Jim and kept in the Hastings herbarium.

Vegetation Data Collection ➜

Vascular Plants

Over the landscape as a whole the six Quercus oak tree species are the most conspicuous plants. Adenostoma fasciculatum shrubs dominate chaparral habitats. Avena and Bromus grasses dominate the grassland, although often with a rich mixture of dominant forbs. One plant that has a great influence on how people use the reservation is the shrubby / viny Toxicodendron diversilobum, poison-oak!

The species list below is based on the Flora of Hastings Reservation, Carmel Valley, California. 1995. Griffin, James T., 3rd. Edition (Stromberg, Mark R., Berman, R., and Mathews, M. A., eds.) 90 pp. Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California Berkeley.

The numbers of vascular plant taxa collected include about:

  • Families . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
  • Genera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325
  • Native species . . . . . . . . . . . . . 428
  • Introduced species . . . . . . . . . . . 139
  • Inter-generic hybrids . . . . . . . . . . . 4
  • Inter-specific hybrids . . . . . . . . . . 8

Important and diverse families include:

  • Asteraceae: 50 genera 84 species
  • Poaceae: 30 genera 74 species
  • Native species . . . . . . . . . . . . . 428
  • Introduced species . . . . . . . . . . . 139
  • Inter-generic hybrids . . . . . . . . . . . 4
  • Inter-specific hybrids . . . . . . . . . . 8

Important and diverse genera include:

  • Trifolium: 14 species
  • Cryptantha: 8 species
  • Mimulus: 12 species
  • Plagiobothrys: 8 species
  • Bromus: 10 species
  • Gnaphalium: 8 species
  • Lupinus: 10 species

Bryophytes: Mosses, Liverworts, Hornworts

Although small in stature, bryophytes play significant roles in diverse terrestrial ecosystems. They are found growing on soil, rocks and/or trees throughout the world, from coastal Antarctica to the peat bogs of the Northern hemisphere, from the deserts of Australia to the rain forests of the Amazon. They are an essential part of this planet's biodiversity. 

The lists below were compiled by Ken Kellman in February, 2007. We have 101 species of known mosses and 14 liverworts and hornworts. You can also download the Moss or Liverwort and Hornwort data sets (Excel).

Mosses
Genus
Species Name
Acaulon
A. muticum
Aloina
A. aloides
A. bifrons
Amphidium
A. californicum
Anacolia
A. baueri
A. menziesii
Antitrichia
A. californica
Atrichum
A. selwynii
A. undulatum
Aulacomnium
A. androgynum
Barbula
B. convoluta
Brachythecium
B. albicans
B. frigidum
B. velutinum
Bryum
B. argenteum
B. bicolor
B. gemmilucens
B. gemmiparum
B. pseudotriquetrum
B. pyriferum
B. radiculosum
B. ruderale
B. sp.
Ceratodon
C. purpureus
C. stenocarpus
Claopodium
C. whippleanum
Conardia
C. compacta
Crossidium
C. squamiferum
Crumia
C. latifolia
Dendroalsia
D. abietina
Dicranella
D. howei
Dicranoweisia
D. cirrata
Didymodon
D. brachyphyllus
D. insulanus
D. nicholsonii
D. tophaceus
D. vinealis
Drepanocladus
D. aduncus
Encalypta
E. vulgaris
Entosthodon
E. californicus
Ephemerum
E. serratum
Epipterygium
E. tozeri
Eucladium
E. verticillatum
Eurhynchium
E. praelongum
Fabronia
F. pusilla
Fissidens
F. bryoides
F. crispus
F. sublimbatus
Funaria
F. hygrometrica
F. muhlenbergii
Grimmia
G. laevigata
G. lisae
G. pulvinata
G. sp.
G. trichophylla
Gymnostomum
G. calcareum
Hedwigia
H. stellata
Hennediella
H. stanfordensis
Homalothecium
H. aeneum
H. arenarium
H. nuttallii
H. pinnatifidum
Isothecium
I. cristatum
I. myosuroides
Leptodictyum
L. humile
L. riparium
Microbryum
M. starkeanum
Orthotrichum
O. bolanderi
O. lyellii
O. rupestre
O. tenellum
Phascum
P. cuspidatum
Philonotis
P. capillaris
Plagiomnium
P. venustum
Pleuridium
P. acuminatum
P. subulatum
Pohlia
P. wahlenbergii
Pseudocrossidium
P. obtusulum
Pterogonium
P. gracile
Rosulabryum
R. canariense
R. capillare
R. gemmascens
Scleropodium
S. cespitans
S. julaceum
S. obtusifolium 
S. touretii
Syntrichia
S. inermis
S. laevipila
S. montana
S. papillosa
S. princeps
S. sucrosa
Timmiella
T. crassinervis
Tortula
T. atrovirens
T. bolanderi
T. brevipes
T. inermis
T. muralis
T. protobryoides
Weissia
W. controversa
Liverworts & Hornwarts
Genus
Species Name
Anthoceros
A. fusiformis
Asterella
A. californica
Athalamia
A. hyalina
Cephaloziella
C. divaricata
Fossombronia
F. longiseta
F. sp.
Frullania
F. bolanderi
Phaeoceros
P. pearsonii
Porella
P. bolanderi
P. cordeana
Riccia
R. crystallina
R. sorocarpa
Sphaerocarpos
S. texanus
Targionia
T. hypophylla

Lichens

About 109 species are included in this list from the Hastings Natural History Reservation (HNHR). The Reservation, on Carmel Valley Road, is administered by the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California, Berkeley.

Little collecting was done on rock, so there are undoubtedly many additions to be made from that source. Only partial determinations are available for some taxa, but such reports are helpful to show presence. Also included are a few additional reports by Bruce Ryan from his short stay at the Reservation some years ago.

Hastings Vegetation Data

In 1991, Jim Griffin and Mark Stromberg re-sampled 40 plots on abandoned farm fields (1937-1996) and relict Nassella grasslands on Hastings, as well as 40 plots on adjacent ranch land. These data are discussed in:  Stromberg, M. R. and J. R. Griffin. 1996. Long-term patterns in coastal California grasslands in relation to cultivation, gophers and grazing. Ecological Applications 6(4): 1189-1211.

Keith White Plots- Blue Oaks Stands, Nassella Stands, 1962-1965

Keith White was the vegetation ecologist at Hastings for years in the 1960s. A prolific worker, Keith published on the Monterey Pines, the Blue Oaks, the understory herb layer and the native grasslands.

Maps, Reports of Fire History, Plot location, Vegetation
Coastal Terrace Prairie Vegetation Data

From 1998 to 2002, Mark Stromberg, Vern Yadon and Paul Kephart sampled data from California coastal terrace grasslands. These data are described in: Stromberg, M. R., P. Kephart and V. Yadon. 2002. Composition, invasibility, and diversity in coastal California grasslands. Madroño 48: 236-252. Several additional coastal terrace grasslands, not discussed in the paper, were sampled are included below. The files are stored in the online storage platform: Box.

Distribution of Forest Trees in California

James Griffin, the long-time resident botanist at Hastings, worked with William Critchfield to map the distribution of forest trees in California and produced a publication by the USFS. This publication (Griffin, J. R. and W. Critchfield 1972. Distribution of Forest Trees in California. USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Stations Research Paper PSW-82, 114pp.) has been scanned and can be downloaded either in its entirety or in smaller segments. This work includes distribution of trees based on the Wieslander maps compiling the natural vegetation of California (Jensen, H. A.(1947. "A system for classifying vegetation in California." California Fish and Game 33: 199-266.) and interviews with hundreds of regional foresters. By the way, these VTM maps are being digitized; contact Barbara Allan Diaz for more details.